Flea Control
CUSTOMIZED  FLEA CONTROL  PROGRAM

PICK YOUR "PLAN"

Whatever "PLAN" you chose it is easy to control fleas. In the "old days" it was a challenge and only moderately successful. However, with today's new, safe flea control products it is very realistic to have your pet and home flea free.

SPECIAL NOTE: Except for severe infestations (you have just moved into a new home and the fleas are heavy, etc.) it is no longer necessary to regularly treat the house and yard. Yard sprays, fumigation (foggers), and carpet powders are a thing of the past.

PLAN A

1)  Keep your dog on a monthly pill (Program or Sentinel) year round. Cats can take a monthly liquid
     (mix in the food) or an every-6-month injection. This medication is safe and essentially functions as
     "birth control" for the fleas (i.e. it keeps the eggs from developing).

 2) Apply a skin spot-on liquid (Frontline Plus) through the summer months, or whenever you see fleas.
     This safely controls biting adult fleas (that cause the itching and rashes) and lasts for 2-3 months
     (used monthly it also controls ticks). Always use once monthly with cats.

3) Administer a daily pill (Capstar) for quick, immediate elimination of adult fleas. This medication kills
     all adult fleas on your pet within hours. It lasts only 1 day and is best used if you see fleas or have
     just taken your pet to a known flea infested area.

PLAN B

1) Use a skin spot-on liquid (Frontline Plus) every 2 months, year round. Once monthly for cats.

2) Administer a daily pill (Capstar) for quick, immediate, extra killing of adult fleas.  This is especially
     helpful if you see fleas on your pet or have just taken it to a known flea infested area and you want
     some short term extra protection.

PLAN C

1)  Administer a daily pill (Capstar) whenever you see fleas on your pet. This is a good approach for
     pets that rarely get fleas. The medication kills all adult fleas within 4 hours and can be repeated
     once daily whenever necessary.

 

Web site designed by Ed Acton for Orange Veterinary Hospital