Housebreaking
HOUSEBREAKING YOUR DOG

USING THE SYSTEM OUTLINED HERE A PUPPY OF 6-8 WEEKS OLD CAN BE SUCCESSFULLY HOUSE BROKEN IN A WEEK OR LESS.

House breaking depends upon the million-year-old instinct in dogs to keep their bed/den clean. You can make use of this instinct by constructing or obtaining a cage, carrier, or box, which will be used to confine the pup for the training period. The box should have a lid or door on it and have adequate ventilation. It should be large enough to allow the puppy to turn around in and lie at full length, but no   larger. if the container is too large (say one you have purchased for use when the pet is an adult) it will   defeat its training purpose.

Most puppies will NOT make a mess in the bed they have to sleep in.  The pup may make a mistake early on but usually won't thereafter. Remember, a box that is too large will not work, as it will allow the pet to soil the area and still go over to the other side to sleep without stress.  Papers or rags work well for bedding.

From the very first moment that you bring the new puppy home it is important that you start giving it all of its naps in this box!  Any time that you are not immediately with the pup it also needs to be in this box. At night when you sleep the pup needs to be in this crate.  Remember, dogs love "dens" by nature and quickly find security and comfort in the box (you are not being cruel). If you let the pup wander the house or if you leave it alone (even to answer the phone) you will find accidents. Everyone likes to play with the new puppy but remember, the house breaking is critically important and needs to be the priority item!

You must take the pup outside or to the designated "toilet area" after every nap, after feeding, or after play.  These are the high elimination times for the animal. Keep the "area" slightly soiled so that the pet knows that this is the correct spot, i.e. where it went last time. Fastidious cleaning defeats the purpose. Give the pup lots of praise every time it "goes" in the correct area.

IMPORTANT POINTS TO REMEMBER

  • A dog can only understand scolding and praise if it occurs within a 1/2 a second of the event you are trying to control. Catching a pup "in the act" is the best time to scold it. After the event has occurred it is too late for scolding or punishment. The pup will associate the scolding with you, NOT the "accident". Their memory is extremely short. Rubbing the pet's nose in the mistake is   worthless
    • This technique only serves to confuse the puppy or make it fearful of you.
       
  • If a "mistake" occurs clean the area well and use an odor neutralizer to remove the scent from the area.  Ammonia or other standard household cleaners will not adequately remove the odor.

 

Web site designed by Ed Acton for Orange Veterinary Hospital