Urologic Syndrome
FELINE URINARY SYNDROME  (FUS)

"Feline urinary syndrome" or FUS will be used to refer to urinary obstruction in male cats.

Although FUS is currently the subject of much study and research, the exact cause is unknown. The influence of environment, heredity, diet, infections and stress are being investigated.  It is currently felt that the cat's diet is a major contributor to FUS in susceptible individuals.

FUS occurs in all breeds and ages, in castrated and non-neutered, in indoor and outdoor cats and in those fed a variety of diets. It is one of the most serious and distressing diseases confronting cat owners and veterinarians. Fortunately new types of food are helping considerably.

Cats with FUS cannot pass their urine because of sand crystals or mucus that plug the urethra (urine canal) near the end of the penis. If not treated promptly, the cat rapidly becomes very sick and can die.

EARLY SYMPTOMS OF TROUBLE:

  1. Irritability or restlessness
  2. Blood in the urine
  3. Frequent trips to the litter box
  4. Straining while in a squatting position (often mistaken for constipation)
  5. Urinating in unaccustomed places about the house (i.e. the sink or bathtub)

    The symptoms of urinary infection and blockage are the same. "Feeling" the abdomen for a distended bladder is the only way to tell the difference.

MORE ADVANCED SYMPTOMS OF FUS

  1. Deep cries of pain
  2. Constant abdominal straining
  3. Swollen, tender abdomen
  4. Inability to walk
  5. Vomiting

 

The presence of FUS is an EMERGENCY SITUATION, and prompt treatment is essential. Treatment is directed at relieving the blockage and controlling pain and spasms with medication. The exact method of treatment depends on the individual pet. Many cats require hospitalization for intensive treatment and observation to watch for repeat blockage. Some pets require urinary catheterization to maintain an open urinary tract until the problem is controlled. If treated early, many FUS patients respond well.  However, recurrence within a few hours to a few months can occur, and some patients die from complications of the disease. Often blood tests are needed to check the kidney function.  In some cases, surgery may be recommended to remove the blockage and enlarge the urinary opening.

 WHEN SURGERY IS NOT INDICATED, HOME CARE MAY INCLUDE:

  1. Antibiotics (for secondary infection problems)
  2. Antispasmodics (to help reduce the pet's straining in the box)
  3. Acidifiers (to help reduce the formation of the crystals)
  4. Diet Changes:
    a) Adding table salt to the food to cause greater water drinking.
    b) Adding water to the food.
    c) Feeding foods specially formulated to dissolve the sandy crystals (prescription only).
  5. Checking the bladder for evidence of recurrent bladder enlargement (Our nurse will show you how).

 

DIETARY MANAGEMENT

URINARY "SAFE" FOODS

BRAND NAME

AVAILABLE FORMS

Waltham (S/O formula)

Canned / Dry

Select Care - HiFactor, Mature, Modified

Canned / Dry

Hills - T/D, S/D, U/D

Canned / Dry

Science Feline Maintenance or Light Formula

Canned / Dry

Friskies Buffet Liver & Beef / Turkey & Giblets

Canned

Tami Ami

Canned / Dry

Fancy Feast Beef & Liver Dinner

Canned

Nature's Recipe Feline Optima

Dry

Iams (active / less active)

Dry

Limited Antigen (all recipes)

Canned / Dry

HOMEMADE RECIPE

      1 lb. ground beef (not ground chuck), braise lightly and retain the fat
      1/4 lb liver, uncooked or lightly braised
      1 cup cooked rice
      1 tsp cooking oil
      1 tsp calcium carbonate-33% (or bone meal).  Also can crush/mix 1 Pet Cal tablet.

      Combine all ingredients. Recipe makes 1 3/4 lb. Excess can be frozen/thawed as needed.

      ==>  Feed 1/4 - 1/2 lb per cat each day.

REMEMBER:  URINARY "SAFE" MEANS THAT THE DIET WILL PROMOTE AN
                         ACIDIC URINE AND REDUCE PHOSPHORUS AND ASH.
                         Both of these factors will reduce the probability of recurrent urinary stones.

 

Web site designed by Ed Acton for Orange Veterinary Hospital